The two pieces I show, “Caracaballo” and “Oculus nebulosus” are metaphors dealing with the breeding of an “ideal horse” and its social meaning during the 17th and 18th century. Horse keeping was an integral part in court culture because of its representative function. It was supposed to meet the demands of “high-art” classic baroque equestrianism. These demands were not only related to the choice of different horse ideals based on their constitution, but also on the appearance of these animals, depending on the beauty standards of this period. In this time, Claude Bourgelat (the director of the first veterinary school in the world in 1761) created a system of measurement that every horse should complete in order to be considered perfect.  If we observe the compact “Ross”, a typical baroque horse race, in some of the paintings from Rubens, interesting human-animal-body related elements could be discovered. For example, in “The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus”, can't we just realize that these female bodies are really similar to the equine ones? Thomas Martin writes in “La beauté équestre” about a parallelism between the beauty ideals from women and horses in the 16th, 17th and 18th century. He makes the reader attentive to the the new trend of wasp-waisted women on the 18th and how did this change of taste also transformed the preferences on horses, now more oriented to the thinner english thorough bred.  I work with the head of a monster; half 3D scanned female, half ideal horse of the 18th century. One did believe that stars and stellar constellations influenced human and horse in their behavior, character and medication like a divine oracle.
       
     
       
     
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 The two pieces I show, “Caracaballo” and “Oculus nebulosus” are metaphors dealing with the breeding of an “ideal horse” and its social meaning during the 17th and 18th century. Horse keeping was an integral part in court culture because of its representative function. It was supposed to meet the demands of “high-art” classic baroque equestrianism. These demands were not only related to the choice of different horse ideals based on their constitution, but also on the appearance of these animals, depending on the beauty standards of this period. In this time, Claude Bourgelat (the director of the first veterinary school in the world in 1761) created a system of measurement that every horse should complete in order to be considered perfect.  If we observe the compact “Ross”, a typical baroque horse race, in some of the paintings from Rubens, interesting human-animal-body related elements could be discovered. For example, in “The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus”, can't we just realize that these female bodies are really similar to the equine ones? Thomas Martin writes in “La beauté équestre” about a parallelism between the beauty ideals from women and horses in the 16th, 17th and 18th century. He makes the reader attentive to the the new trend of wasp-waisted women on the 18th and how did this change of taste also transformed the preferences on horses, now more oriented to the thinner english thorough bred.  I work with the head of a monster; half 3D scanned female, half ideal horse of the 18th century. One did believe that stars and stellar constellations influenced human and horse in their behavior, character and medication like a divine oracle.
       
     

The two pieces I show, “Caracaballo” and “Oculus nebulosus” are metaphors dealing with the breeding of an “ideal horse” and its social meaning during the 17th and 18th century. Horse keeping was an integral part in court culture because of its representative function. It was supposed to meet the demands of “high-art” classic baroque equestrianism. These demands were not only related to the choice of different horse ideals based on their constitution, but also on the appearance of these animals, depending on the beauty standards of this period. In this time, Claude Bourgelat (the director of the first veterinary school in the world in 1761) created a system of measurement that every horse should complete in order to be considered perfect.

If we observe the compact “Ross”, a typical baroque horse race, in some of the paintings from Rubens, interesting human-animal-body related elements could be discovered. For example, in “The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus”, can't we just realize that these female bodies are really similar to the equine ones? Thomas Martin writes in “La beauté équestre” about a parallelism between the beauty ideals from women and horses in the 16th, 17th and 18th century. He makes the reader attentive to the the new trend of wasp-waisted women on the 18th and how did this change of taste also transformed the preferences on horses, now more oriented to the thinner english thorough bred.

I work with the head of a monster; half 3D scanned female, half ideal horse of the 18th century. One did believe that stars and stellar constellations influenced human and horse in their behavior, character and medication like a divine oracle.

       
     
fraukopf.jpg
       
     
bild_web.jpg
       
     
Caracaballo2_foto Diethild Meier.jpg
       
     
10.jpg
       
     
8.jpg
       
     
11.jpg
       
     
2.jpg
       
     
9.jpg
       
     
       
     
Caracaballo